Subchorionic Hemorrhage Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ'S)

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SubChorionic Hemorrhage pregnancy outcome


Subchorionic layer is a membrane in uterus that acts as a protective layer for fetus. Ladies whose sonogram suggest a subchorionic hematoma must be monitored for possible complications and prognosis should done accordingly. Final results of the fetus depends on the size of the hematoma, the mother age, and the fetus's gestational age.. First- or Second-trimester bleeding imparts more complications and makes prognosis difficult. The presence of subchorionic hemorrhage (Sch) in the beginning of pregnancy detected sonographically (subchorionic hematoma) may increase the chances of miscarriage, stillbirth, abruptio placentae, and preterm exertions.

The subchorionic hemorrhage (subchorionic hematoma) builds up between the uterine wall and the chorionic membrane and can leak via the cervical canal. Later during the first trimester and early second trimester, the subchorionic hematoma may also partly strip away the developing placenta from its attachment site. Therefore, pregnancy outcome might be worst in case early hemorrhage as compared to those having subchorionic hemorrhage in later ages.

The subchorionic hematoma may disappear (drain back into circulatory system) with the passage of time if they are small or medium in size but large hematomas do not resolve on their own they must be monitored carefully because in later stages they may cause compression of gestational sac and leading to rupture of membranes with consequent spontaneous abortion.

Subchorionic Hemorrhage and sex


A subchorionic hematoma is just like a mini placental abruption. The 2 vital factors which decide the outcome in this situation, first the dimensions of the clot and secondly the gap from the placenta. The small the dimensions and the extra distant it's miles from placenta, the higher are the possibilities of recuperation.

Nobody is aware of the precise reason of the hematoma. Sexual activity must surely be avoided as it places plenty of pressure and can bring about the worsening of the hematoma. Usually, if the clot/hematoma increases in size, miscarriage occurs with in 16 weeks and if nothing occurs till then, there are high possibilities that the hematoma is absorbed.


Subchorionic Hemorrhage Cramping


Cramping in pregnancy might be common but it should not be taken lightly if it remains consistent during early trimesters. It can be result of brownish spotting due to corpus luteum defect in early pregnancy which requires supplementation of progesterone hormone. Risk associated with such defect is threatened miscarriage, although the such possibility significantly reduces after the passage of primary trimester. Other reasons can be due to placenta previa or some subchorionic hemorrhage. You need to take bed rest, do not climb stairs or raise heavy weights and seek advice from a gynecologist regularly.

Subchorionic Hemorrhage Prognosis


Subchorionic layer is a membrane in uterus that acts as a protective layer for fetus. Ladies whose sonogram suggest a subchorionic hematoma must be monitored for possible complications and prognosis should done accordingly. Final results of the fetus depends on the size of the hematoma, the mother age, and the fetus's gestational age.

Overall prognosis ratio largely depends upon number of factors like age of expectant mother, pregnancy trimester, subchorionic hemorrhage size etc. Clinically, it has been observed that subchorionic hemorrhage that occurs during early pregnancy poses too much risk to fetal growth because they neither absorbs back by circulatory system nor they resolve on their own. After passage of time they puts lot of pressure to gestational sac that ultimately leads to miscarriage. In short, size of subchorionic hemorrhage is the most prominent factor that defines the overall prognosis of pregnancy outcome.